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Saint Paul College A Community & Technical College

​​​2017-2018 Common Book Author Series

A Good time for the truth  
A Good Time for the Truth:​
Race in Minnesota edited by Sun Yung Shin.

The purpose of a common book is to build campus-wide community through a common intellectual experience, and to engage the wider community in thought and discussion on related issues. We invite you to read the year’s book, join in discussions, and participate in our events.

For more information about the common book program, contact Celeste Mazur, Learning Communities Coordinator, celeste.mazur@saintpaul.edu, 651.846.1373.

Related Materials

Disparate Impacts: Moving to Minnesota to Live Just Enough for the City

READING & DISCUSSION OF

"Disparate Impacts: Moving to Minnesota to Live Just Enough for the City" with Taiyon Coleman

Tuesday, February 6 - 1-2pm (Saint Paul College Theatre)

Taiyon is a 2017 recipient of a McKnight Foundation Artist Fellowship in creative prose. She is assistant professor of English Literature at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota, and her most recent writing, "Poems as Maps: An Introduction," appears in the August 2017 issue of Places Journal

Discomfort Zone: Minnesota Born and Raised

READING & DISCUSSION OF

"Discomfort Zone: Minnesota Born and Raised" with Sherry Quan Lee

Wednesday, March 28 11am-12pm (Saint Paul College "University Center," conjoined rooms 1506-1510)

​Sherry Quan Lee approaches writing as a community resource and as culturally based art of an ordinary everyday practical aesthetic. Her most recent book, "Love Imagined: A Mixed Race Memoir," was a 2015 Minnesota Book Award finalist.

A Surrealist History of One Asian American in Minnesota

READING & DISCUSSION OF

"A Surrealist History of One Asian American in Minnesota" with David Mura

Thursday, April 19 - 10-11am (Saint Paul College Theatre)

Mura is director of training for the Innocent Classroom, a program devised by writer Alexs Pate to address the racial achievement gap by training K-12 educators to improve their relationships with students of color. David Mura has written two memoirs: "Turning Japanese," a Josephine Miles Book Award/Oakland PEN winner and a New York Times Notable Book, and "Where the Body Meets Memory."

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